Deadwood creation

Here is a selection of the deadwood working sometimes called carving but I rarely carve, I create by stripping, burning and blasting. I do use Dremels and Makita to remove bulk but the majority of the work is done slowly by hand. It’s important to me that the work I do is indistinguishable from the natural deadwood created by nature. Every one of these photos has some deadwood created by me contained in the image. Most of the trees are Taxus (Yew), there are some softwood trees such as Hawthorn but that’s usually done to hollow trees to give the appearance of age.

You can find more deadwood working HERE and HERE

Ankerwycke Yew 2500-year-old Tree

The National Trust’s oldest tree, this iconic 2,500-year-old (I think a lot older) yew is steeped in history. According to popular belief, it was beneath this tree that King Henry VIII courted Anne Boleyn, and some reports suggest that he even proposed in its shadow. While Magna Carta is said to have been sealed at Runnymede, there are those who argue that the event actually took place on the other side of the river, perhaps under this very yew.

Carolyn and I visited this amazing Yew tree earlier this year It’s a little out of the way, across a few fields, down an avenue of lime trees and across another field but well worth the journey, open all year round its not easy to find, only small signpost quite a way from where you can park.

 

Further work on a Yamadori Yew ‘Pagoda’ style

This tree was collected over 5 years ago, this is a tall thin English Yew (Taxus Baccata), it has a shari that runs from top to base. Its never been re-potted out of this washing up bowl and it is now ready. The first work was done in December 2017 you can see the blog post HERE, not actually styling but formulating the branch structure and foliage locations. No wiring, no styling no branch positioning, the tree was left to grow. All I will do over the next 12 months watch out for wire cutting into the branches. The tree will be re-potted in February 2020.