Planting a Yamadori Yew on a rock

This amazing windswept tree belongs to my best mate in Bonsai Terry Foster. It has been planted on a rock for a number of years but Terry was never happy with the composition. Terry has access to some wonderful pieces of wavy rock that he collected on his travels. The new piece was more suited to the final image that Terry wanted.

Terry had prepared the rock by drilling a large hole in the base, and placing brass screws to secure tie wires to.

The whole project took 2 hours. The photos tell the story

The BIG Scots Pine

This amazing Scots pine was collected two seasons ago, next year the tree will be strong enough to start preparatory work, I cannot wait to get my hands on this beauty.

Han Kengai Yew second wiring and deadwood

I have been working this tree for 5 years, collected in 2011 its hard to imagine that this is the same tree. This is a photo when the tree was first potted up. the tree has been turned 180 degrees.

Take a look back at the tree in 2014

The tree has undergone two wiring, the second one today. Its been a process of building strength in the tree, developing branches and creating a dense foliage mass. I guess that it will be at least two more years before the tree is anywhere near showing. I have a lovely Gordon Duffet pot ready for the tree when it is potted next April/May.

 

han-kengai-oct-16

 

Yew Bonsai Foliage mass development 3 Videos

Yew are one of the best species for creating bonsai, they have beautiful hard deadwood, lush evergreen foliage and beautiful red live veins. In these three videos I explains how he builds branch structure and creates dense foliage clouds.

Here are some of the images from the videos, Click on the video links below to watch the movies.

Yew technique Part 1

Yew technique Part 2

Yew technique Part 3

Improving the success rate of Yamadori

I have been using this technique now for over ten years and I have finally decided to share what I have learned. The technique is known as ‘sweating’ and is used extensively in arboretorial circles. I use for the following species: Cratageus, Prunus, and most of the Rosaceae family, do not use on evergreen species.

I collect trees with as much root as possible, but I have put roots on trees that have not had any.

Follow this procedure and your success rate in establishing your freshly collected yamadori will improve immeasurably.

  1. Collect as much root as possible
  2. Clear as much mountain soil but do not wash the roots
  3. Use the soil mix as shown below
  4. Clean cut the major roots as close to the trunk without spoiling the nebari
  5. Place the tree in the smallest container possible
  6. Ensure that the tree is well packed in the container
  7. Wire the tree securely in the pot
  8. Make sure that the cut branches are clean and NOT SEALED
  9. Saturate the soil
  10. Pile fresh sphagnum moss on the surface of the container
  11. Wrap the whole tree in a VERY large black plastic bag
  12. Place in a sunny position as the tree MUST GET HOT
  13. Humidity in the bag must be high at all times, mist spray daily
  14. After two or three weeks new buds will appear particularly around the cuts
  15. Ensure that they do not touch the sides of the bag.
  16. When the new shoots reach 5cm or 2” remove from the bag and protect from cold and wind, mist spray daily and keep out of direct sunlight.
  17. Keep watch for the new shoots hardening off, then you can feed with a very diluted solution; do not work the tree for the first 12 months.

Good luck, please do not copy these photos or the text, and share the link freely.